Tag Archives: music download

KDDI LISMO: Best Mobile Music Service in the World

KDDI Neon KDDI au

Few people are aware about the huge success that KDDI, #2 mobile operator in Japan, has achieved in selling music to mobile phones. LISMO is the name of the music service available to KDDI au subscribers, that offers song downloads over the air.

In a press release back in February 2007, KDDI already announced that they have exceeded 100 Million song downloads, since the EZ “Chaku-Uta Full” full track download was launched in November 2004.

The following table shows the remarkable growth:

KDDI and Sony announced in October 2007 that LISMO will now enable ‘Chaku-uta Full’ files downloaded to au mobile phones to be transferred to Sony audio equipment via a new ‘LISMO Port’ PC software. It is to work with Sony Walkman and with Sony Net Juke, HDD Stereo System. The service is named ‘au x Sony MUSIC PROJECT’. The intention is to make the protected music available to other devices than the au phones, in response to international music labels embracing DRM-free downloads.

The move also highlights how Sony and KDDI defend from the imminent iPhone assault to Japan. KDDI has a portfolio of music phones quite impressive, that will give a tough battle to iPhone. Sony may have lost the worldwide battle for mp3 players to Apple but, in cooperation with KDDI, might still resist in its domestic market. 3G iPhone in Japan will also be required to download songs over the air, to compete with KDDI service and devices.

KDDI LISMO shows how an operator with determination and courage is able to provide mobile entertainment without giving away the Service and Customer ownership, as AT&T’s has done with the iPhone and Verizon Wireless with the MTV/RealNetworks Rhapsody music service. Even NTT DoCoMo, number one operator in Japan, has been unable to replicate KDDI success after seeking agreements with Napster and Microsoft.

Well done KDDI. Keep giving example to other mobile operators.

Music DRM is dead

log sony bmg
At last, the Music industry seems to start accepting that Internet and mp3 have changed the way people consume songs.

The announcement that Sony BMG will launch a DRM-free music download service, confirms the death of Music DRM. Last month Warner Music announced that they would sell DRM-free music through Amazon. Some months earlier, EMI and Vivendi Universal did similar announcements. The four biggest labels finally abandon DRM, the technology that users renamed as Digital Restrictions Management, instead of the original Digital Rights Management.

The push to kill DRM came from Apple itself in early 2007. When pressed to license iTunes DRM to other mp3 players, Steve Jobs refused, as licensing would mean leaking vital info that keeps DRM unbroken. Furthermore, he advised labels to remove protection instead. Steve Jobs reminded labels that they were already providing unprotected music whenever they sold a CD. 

A few months later, DRM’s death it is a reality.  Music labels are in a better position now than previously with Apple’s near-monopoly on music download. Amazon and the labels going direct will be a strong competition to Apple.

Both the consumers and the Music industry will win.

The new generations do not see a moral issue with file-sharing


An eye-opening article in New York Times about the generational divide on copyright morality, by David Pogue.

Compared to a few years back, the new generation of teenagers do not find any moral concern about copying and sharing copyrighted material, as the experiment from David Pogue shows.

I wondered whether my 8 months son, would buy from iTunes in the future or would download with BitTorrent and eMule. This article makes be believe that most likely the latter, but not entirely.

New generations would  be willing to pay for content, but only for the content they really love.

In the past, you had to buy the CD just to realize that only 2 or 3 songs were worth it . These times are gone, however painful it is for the music industry. The technology has changed the rules of the game, and digital content can be widely and inexpensively distributed.

I am sure all the teenagers in the article experiment, would have objected to people making money from the creations of others – i.e piracy. But what harm does a private copy do to an artist, except having his works known to more people? Why would an artist oppose to having their creations available for a biggest audience?

People would NOT buy most of the content they share/download today.

Good artist will always find the way to be compensated for their work.