Tag Archives: iPhone

Marketers, do you really consider iPads as mobile?

percentage-of-retail-e-commerce-dollars-spent-via-mobile-devices
You will find more statistics at Statista

Prediction is hard, specially when it’s about the future.

The chart shows the incredible growth of mobile commerce. Excited? Well, not so much. It’s all driven by the iPad. When ten years ago many analyst predicted that mobile-commerce would be the future, few actually meant tablets to be part of the story?

One thing is that Steve Job presented the iPad and the Macbook Air as mobile devices. Another thing is that for digital marketing purposes, analyst consider it so.

Despite sharing the same OS as the iPhone, the use of an iPad is actually closer to a laptop than to a smartphone. I often buy from Amazon using my iPad instead of my laptop, even when at home. Same for online banking. In both cases, I use the original website, not the mobile one. When I am on the go, the iPhone is always with me, but not the iPad. When I am sitting in a Starbucks I may take an iPad, but still, it replaces the laptop rather than the mobile phone.

Categorizing the iPad as mobile is misleading. The use of a tablet differs from. If you are making decisions on your ad budget based on an analyst that categorizes iPad as mobile, think twice.

That said, technology-wise it has a big implication. Kill your Adobe Flash site if you haven’t yet. Just bet on HTML5 for all versions of your site, mobile, tablet, laptop-desktop or TV.

mobilecontentmarketing

Enhanced by Zemanta

The Reason Why Apple’s Stock Is Sliding

applecharts-growthyoy

See those huge growth peaks in 2008, 2010 and 2011? They are the result of two products that changed two industries forever: mobile and personal computing.

The chart just shows what’s normal when you hit a homerun with a product that shakes an entire industry:

– in 2008, it’s the iPhone 3G
– in 2010 and 2011 it’s the iPad and iPad 2

You can only get that type of growth when you launch a new product that creates a new market category by itself.
Is the current growth of “only 20%” a sign that Apple is losing its mojo? No.
Can you expect Apple to grow at 70-80% YoY as they did in the past without releasing a new breakthrough product? No.
Is there any product in the pipe with such a potential? I don’t think so. TV is in the radar, but I wouldn’t bet on it to be as big. Google/Youtube seems in better position to disrupt TV — and I don’t mean Google TV.

Apple’s stock price has dropped 35% since September, reducing in $250 billion the company’s market cap.

The market is just coming to terms with the fact that you don’t change an entire industry as big as mobile and personal computing every couple of years.  Not even if you are Apple. The growth Apple had was exceptional, and you can’t expect it to continue at that rate just with new versions of iPhones, iPads and Macs.

Anyway, a 20%+ growth YoY without any new bomb product, is a growth most companies only dream of. And Apple mindshare of higher-income customers looks intact.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Connecting the dots: Why the iPod changed the world?

Via Business Insider.

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.”
                   Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Address, 2005

In 2006 it was clear that mobile phones and MP3 players would converge. Nokia, the smartphone leader at the time, already incorporated mp3 players in their phones. In Japan, KDDI had the most advanced mobile music service in the world, selling millions of songs per month downloaded from mobile phones.

For Apple, the iPod was at risk. At that time the iPod had become the product that had turned around Apple. iPods were more than 50% of Apple’s revenues in 2006 — see chart. Nokia was set to go for the iPod. Apple had to defend. The iPhone development was a matter of survival. Eat or be eaten.

Before the iPhone was unveiled in 2007, anyone would have bet that handset makers (and telcos) were in better place to win the race for the converged phone/MP3 player.
Few would have bet that a company with no experience in mobile would succeed to put a solid product in place so quick. In the early 2000s all main handset makers came from telecom vendors: Nokia, Ericsson, Siemens, Alcatel, Motorola, NEC coped the top of the charts. Even Sony had to join forces with Ericsson to play in the field. Microsoft venture into smartphones had given expensive and unstable smartphones after many years of experience with PDAs.

Then the genius of Steve Jobs made it. Leveraging on Apple’s core competency in making computers, they made a leapfrog. With no legacy to respect, unlike Nokia.

Today the iPhone is more than 50% of Apple’s revenue. It was the stepping stone without which the iPad had not had the form and success it had in changing personal computing forever.

The iPod today is less that 5% of Apple’s revenues. It went from 50% in 2006 to less than 5% in 2012. Had Apple failed to win the battle for the convergent phone/Mp3 player, Apple would have not even survived with a leading product such as the iPod.

It’s the perfect model for a market dominant player to lead disruption. It was the leader in the MP3 segment who drove its cannibalization and won. Cannibalize to survive. Easier said than done.

Connecting the dots
If Jobs wouldn’t have bet on the iPod—which at the time was not an obvious product for a computer maker—, Apple would not have been in such a good position to enter mobile and reinvent it. And without the iPhone experience, the iPad wouldn’t have been the hit that has changed personal computing. In hindsight, without the iPod, the tablet might have not existed as we know it.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Apple and 1984

The chart posted under the title Android Phones Will Sell Well This Holiday Season might have been done to show that consumers still buy more computers than iPads and more smatphones (non-iPhone) than iPhones. But think twice…

Are you saying that 18% of people will buy an iPad vs 20% buying a computer? Almost as many iPads as computers! many of which will be Macs!!
Are you saying that 13% will want an iPhone, vs 19% any other phone, when the iPhone is only available in one single carrier in US?
Are we comparing the iPad to the total consumer computer industry (which includes a healthy portion for Apple)?
Are we comparing a single phone model in one carrier to the rest of smartphones across all carriers?

How far are we from complete domination by Apple?
How far are we from an Apple world, just like 1984, guided under our beloved master Steve Jobs?

I would not be surprised that in a few years kids start asking why we named a fruit after the name of the maker of the iPad.

[Read] NYT: Apple Passes Microsoft as No. 1 in Tech

Apple-vs-Microsoft

The moment came when Apple surpassed Microsoft in Market Cap [*].

A few numbers:

Market Cap: Microsoft at $219 billion – Apple at $222 billion (yesterday)
Revenue: Microsoft at $58.4 billion – Apple at $42.9 billion
Net income: Microsoft at $14.6 billion – Apple at $5.7 billion
Cash: Microsoft at $39.7 billion – Apple at $23.1 billion

Microsoft is still has bigger earnings, but Apple has the momentum. Apple still sells computers, but twice as much revenue is coming from hand-held devices and music. And smartphone sales are growing faster than PCs.

Worse for Microsoft, analyst perceived that “The battle has shifted from Microsoft against Apple to Apple against Google,” as said Tim Bajarin, a technology analyst following Apple.

Google has a market cap of $151 billion.

Read original NYT Article: Apple Passes Microsoft as No. 1 in Tech

[Chart] Apple Gets Close to Microsoft on Market Cap

chart-of-teh-day-market-capitalization-microsoft-vs-apple-052410

Via Silicon Alley Insider. The great turnaround of Apple illustrated in a chart.

Since the iPhone launch in 2007 Apple has been getting closer to Microsoft faster and faster. The iPad “effect” is closing the final gap. It is only a matter of time that Apple will surpass Microsoft in market cap. Apple’s “reinvention” of the phone is paying off.

When Microsoft announced Windows Phone 7,  a newspaper headline read “Microsoft follows Apple and Google and moves into Smartphones”. It is a pity (for Microsoft)  the reporter had not noticed that Microsoft had Windows Mobile phones for several years before the  iPhone…

A few days before personal computing changes forever

iPad

A few days before the iPad is out I am ready to make my bet. It  will be a revolution.

The iPhone was a revolution for mobile handsets.  Nokia laughed at Apple when they launched a new phone in what was a “mature” market. Now, no one doubts that Steve Jobs was actually right when he said  “Today Apple is going to reinvent the phone” in January 2007.

David Pogue’s review of the iPad is worth reading. “It is basically  a gigantic iPod Touch”, it could not be described in less words.

I would take from his review the insight that the iPad is no substitute for a laptop for tasks to create content, like writing docs, presentations, coding software, not to mention any more sophisticated content like photo or video editing. But it IS a great device to consume content, like reading, web browsing, watching video or gaming. And for that purpose, the experience is even better than a laptop.

The lack of Adobe Flash is an issue, but  looking at the speed that video sites  and video platforms like Brightcove or Oolaya are preparing for the iPad, it might not be a show-stopper; specially if Hulu launches an iPad application as rumored.

If after reading Pogue’s review still in doubt, BBspot.com offer a decision flow chart. Not that I agree with it, but it’s funny…

ipad-flowchart

TechCrunch announces more reviews hitting the net.