Tag Archives: HTML5

Marketers, do you really consider iPads as mobile?

percentage-of-retail-e-commerce-dollars-spent-via-mobile-devices
You will find more statistics at Statista

Prediction is hard, specially when it’s about the future.

The chart shows the incredible growth of mobile commerce. Excited? Well, not so much. It’s all driven by the iPad. When ten years ago many analyst predicted that mobile-commerce would be the future, few actually meant tablets to be part of the story?

One thing is that Steve Job presented the iPad and the Macbook Air as mobile devices. Another thing is that for digital marketing purposes, analyst consider it so.

Despite sharing the same OS as the iPhone, the use of an iPad is actually closer to a laptop than to a smartphone. I often buy from Amazon using my iPad instead of my laptop, even when at home. Same for online banking. In both cases, I use the original website, not the mobile one. When I am on the go, the iPhone is always with me, but not the iPad. When I am sitting in a Starbucks I may take an iPad, but still, it replaces the laptop rather than the mobile phone.

Categorizing the iPad as mobile is misleading. The use of a tablet differs from. If you are making decisions on your ad budget based on an analyst that categorizes iPad as mobile, think twice.

That said, technology-wise it has a big implication. Kill your Adobe Flash site if you haven’t yet. Just bet on HTML5 for all versions of your site, mobile, tablet, laptop-desktop or TV.

mobilecontentmarketing

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Why Google Acquires Widevine?

W3C’s HTML5 FAQ page might give some clues (see screenshot) about why Google buys Widevine, a DRM vendor that powers Netflix among others. What if Google adds DRM to HTML5 video?

Google did something similar when they bought On2 and open-sourced VP8 as part of WebM. This move pushed MPEGLA to make h.264 royalty-free for Web video. The iPad did the rest to accelerate adoption of HTML5/h.264 video in the web.

HTML5 video with DRM is what Youtube needs to convince content owners, movie studios in particular, that their content will be protected. Furthermore, HTML5 video with DRM, combined with cool HTML5 UIs, makes the Web Browser an ideal front-end for video on any screen. Where there is a browser, Google will make money with ads.

Adding open source DRM to HTML5 is consistent with Google’s web centric vision. Chrome OS is a perfect example of that vision, illustrated in this recent post on Google’s blog (with Eric Schmidt’s talk on the Chrome event this week).

I tend to think Google sees this acquisition more strategic than just adding DRM to GoogleTV.

HTML5 and Netflix

Netflix explains in this post how they use HTML5 for their UI frontend and logic

HTML5 brings to the table, the freedom to create rich, dynamic and interactive experiences for any platform with a web browser. In fact, we’re also using HTML5 to create the user experience for our iPhone, iPad and Android applications as well

[…] HTML5 […] is delivered from Netflix servers every time you launch our application. This means we can constantly update, test and improve the experience we offer. […] Our customers don’t have to go through a manual process to install new software every time we make a change, it “just happens.”

[…] our world class UI engineers can seamlessly move between working on our website, our mobile experience, and our television-based applications.

This clip shows a sample of how that HTML5-based UI looks on a PS3.

HTML5: The Future of the Web is Here

The clip shows how close HTML5 performance is to that of a native iOS iPad app. Can you believe this is running on a browser?

Disruption is not only about technology, it is also about business models. If the App Store revolutionized mobile apps, the just released Chrome 8 will support Chrome OS Store, that could take the App model to the browser.

To get up to speed on HTML5:
http://diveintohtml5.org/ by Mark Pilgrim
http://www.html5rocks.com/ by Google

A nice HTML5 app: http://everytimezone.com/

Clip seen here: HTML5: not ready for primetime, but getting very close

[Chart] Apple Makes HTML5 Video Grow

With more than 7 million iPads sold in a few months, no one doubts that the iPad has forever changed personal computing. The chart, via the Business Insider once again,  shows the growth of HTML5 video this year, which is clearly driven by the iPad and its lack of support for Flash.

Adobe must be  worried. From total dominance of online video to “No Flash? No worries“.

Flash Vs. HTML5: Google Will Decide

tablet2.100

The future of Adobe Flash is in the hands of Google.

Apple’s reluctance to support Flash on the iPhone and the iPad is putting tremendous pressure on the future of Adobe’s ubiquitous platform, present in 98% of browsers worldwide.

The Adobe Flash Player  is the engine behind 99% of  Video in the web. Adobe Flash Player 10.1, soon to be released, was supposed to take Flash Player dominance together with online video to mobile handsets. But Google and Apple insistence in an Open Web with HTML5 native video (among other capabilities) that make Flash irrelevant can ruin Adobe’s plans. Apple bet of non supporting Flash even on the iPad shows they are pretty determined to kill Flash.

Abobe is going from being the ‘good guy’ that enabled video on the Web, to the ‘bad guy’ that imposes proprietary technology and that crashes browsers too often. Is Flash doomed to die then? It is up to Google.

Apple and Google close romance is turning to an end as both turn to competitors rather than friends in smartphones, office applications, browsers, OS, and soon in tablets and ebooks.

With Chrome OS now targeting the trendy tablet feast too, the support of Flash Player on Chrome OS and Android can give an edge over Apple’s rivals.  Having all video on the web on Google powered smarphones and tablets, that would be a huge advantage to Google.

But Google could also well decide to stick to its principles and go full speed on the HTML5 open web vision, shared with Apple. If Google moves all YouTube content to HTML5, who on Earth is not going to install an HTML5 browser? Even the stubborn IE6 laggards would finally wake up and change. How long would it take for other web video properties to move to HTML5 and drop Flash?

Update: Good ZDNet post on the HTML vs. Flash war.

Update 2: Good explanation on Gizmodo about HTML5 and Flash

Update 3: Great post on TechCrunch on the Future of Web Content