Tag Archives: file-sharing

How will Music Industry survive Internet?

The Music Industry can not keep fighting to preserve their status quo. Internet, mp3 and iPods have changed the way we ingest music. DVD/CDs are doomed to disappear. The music and film industry will need to adapt to survive.

A wonderful extensive article has been published by Wired: David Byrne’s Survival Strategies for Emerging Artists — and Megastars. This is the best informed article I have recently read on this topic.

This chart from the article shows the trend for the Music Industry both in size and in formats.

With the costs of recording, manufacturing and distribution going down to almost zero thanks to Internet and new technologies, the role of the music labels becomes very thin, and many will disappear. At the same time, live performances are not part of promotion any more, but a business in itself generating revenues for artists. Similar to the music model before the 20th century, where artist made money mainly with performances. Only that today there is merchandising, advertisement rights, and publishing royalties (for adding the song to an ad or a movie) to add to the money inflow of artists.

Internet help artists to have their works popular to a wider audience. Artists have only to adapt to the new business models. Labels will need some painful restructuring, just as other industries had before.

The new generations do not see a moral issue with file-sharing


An eye-opening article in New York Times about the generational divide on copyright morality, by David Pogue.

Compared to a few years back, the new generation of teenagers do not find any moral concern about copying and sharing copyrighted material, as the experiment from David Pogue shows.

I wondered whether my 8 months son, would buy from iTunes in the future or would download with BitTorrent and eMule. This article makes be believe that most likely the latter, but not entirely.

New generations would  be willing to pay for content, but only for the content they really love.

In the past, you had to buy the CD just to realize that only 2 or 3 songs were worth it . These times are gone, however painful it is for the music industry. The technology has changed the rules of the game, and digital content can be widely and inexpensively distributed.

I am sure all the teenagers in the article experiment, would have objected to people making money from the creations of others – i.e piracy. But what harm does a private copy do to an artist, except having his works known to more people? Why would an artist oppose to having their creations available for a biggest audience?

People would NOT buy most of the content they share/download today.

Good artist will always find the way to be compensated for their work.